Month: May 2016

EU Referendum 2 – Politics without the Politicians

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The referendum debate rages on… but is the quality of the discourse increasing with its volume? If you want a little more than how Hitler would vote and how Putin’s keeping abreast of the situation, the next Politics in the Pub’s for you.

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As the politicians move ever further apart, with every claim countered and every fact parried, we wanted to hear from those without political skin in the game. They’re knowledgeable, they’re educated, they work with, in and sometimes despite the EU every day… and none of them are looking for your vote. We’ve handpicked the guests because of their experience and interest, but, most of all, their ability to given a neutral, reasoned, nuanced to an argument that grows more polarised by the hour.

If you want to know what it’s really like for business in Europe, how the EU actually affects our laws and the truth about the economic argument, you’ve got to come to EU Referendum 2.

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Our Panel

From business, Andrew Mason, MD of New Mason Design*

As an employer, an entrepreneur and a trader, Andrew is well-used to working within building regulations, employment law and importing goods, so will be a great person to hear how the EU affects, for good or ill, British businesses.

New Mason Design is a Bradford-based company specialising in breathing life back into historical buildings, marrying traditional architecture with modern technology, so Bradford, with its wonderful but often unloved architecture, is the perfect marketplace.

Andrew was born in Shipley and had a varied career before graduating from Warwick as a mature student. He travelled Latin America and South Africa working in social housing, getting held up at gun point twice in the process, before returning to Yorkshire. He started working on Bradford’s regeneration 20 years ago and has been hooked ever since. Outside of breathing life back into Bradford’s unloved gems, he is a keen reader, walker & gardener and enjoys the odd pint – so I know we can help him out with the last one.

From academia and economics, Dr Mark Baimbridge, Senior Lecturer in Economics at University of Bradford*

Mark is an expert in Britain’s relationship with the EU, his research interests including European economics, political integration and the Eurozone. He has written widely on the subject of economics and Europe, including reporting to the Treasury Select Committee on globalisation and business investment.

Mark is excellently placed to tell us about how the EU affects academia and the possible economic impact of Brexit.

From the law, Debbie Jukes, Head of Professional Knowledge at a leading UK law firm*

Debbie is now Head of Knowledge at a global law firm which has over 3500 lawyers worldwide, and is responsible for, amongst other things, the research team and legal libraries. Her team has been actively involved in researching and educating the firm’s clients on the likely impact on them Brexit in legal terms – providing training, seminars, briefings and helping clients build contingency plans. She is corporate/ and commercial lawyer having specialised for over 20 years in advising clients on mergers & acquisitions, long term commercial contracts, outsourcings and joint ventures, particularly in the financial services sector.

Debbie is naturalised Yorkshire. She grew up near the Welsh border before seeing the light and moving to Yorkshire nearly 30 years ago for work. She’s a regular at Politicsw in the Pub, bringing along her 18 year old son who, as a politics student, is now capable of out arguing Debbie and the entire family on anything and everything – so we’re offering her family counselling rather than the customary pint given to speakers.

If you want to hear from experts in their fields, people who, together, know the EU inside and out, and can tell you what it’s really like now and could be like after the referendum, book your ticket today.

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*Please note, all our panellists are appearing in a personal capacity and any views they express about the European Union or the forthcoming referendum are personal views and are not necessarily the views of their employers and should not be inferred as such.